Province Summary


Asotin Subbasin Summary

The Asotin Creek Subbasin is composed of 325 square miles located in Asotin and Garfield Counties drained by Asotin Creek, Couse Creek, Tenmile Creek and their tributaries. Asotin Creek originates in the Blue Mountains and is a tributary to the Snake River, draining an area of 208,000 acres. Rainfall ranges from more than 45 inches in the higher elevations to 12 inches in the lower elevations. Melting snow from the Blue Mountains provides much of the annual runoff to the streams and rivers in the subbasin; the water level in many streams diminishes greatly during the summer months. Vegetation in the subbasin is characterized by grasslands and agricultural lands at lower elevations and evergreen forests at higher elevations.

Pasture/rangeland (43 percent), cropland (26 percent), and forestland (30 percent) are the primary land uses in the subbasin. Approximately 67 percent of the Asotin Subbasin is in private ownership; most of this land is in the lower portion of the watershed.

Source: Asotin Subbasin Plan.

Status and Trends of Focal Species in Asotin Subbasin
 
Species ESU MPG Population Biological Objective (s) Biological Status Federal Status Data / Charts
Spring Chinook Snake River  Lower Snake River  Asotin Creek  Draft Recovery Plan Criteria :
500 natural adults286
 
NOSA Estimates
2016: 4 Adults 474
Redd Counts (natural)
2015: 0 redds 4
Threatened Status & Trends
Summer Steelhead Snake River   Lower Snake River  Asotin Creek  Draft Recovery Plan Criteria :
1,000 natural adults286
 
NOSA Estimate
2017 : 313 Adults474
Adult Counts (Natural)
2013 : 98 natural adults
Alpowa Creek - 98 natural adults 165
2013 : Asotin Creek above George Creek - 839 natural adults 165
2012 : George Creek - 107 natural adults 165
Redd Counts (mixed)
2015 : 317 redds (mixed) 3
Juvenile Outmigrants
2016 : 26,969 juveniles outmigrating 474
Threatened Status & Trends
    
View abundance data for Asotin Subbasin
 
Hatcheries located in Asotin Subbasin
**Hatchery data will be updated in 2016**

   There are no hatcheries located in this subbasin.
 
 
Hatchery Releases and Returns to Asotin Subbasin359
**Hatchery data will be updated in 2016**

Some releases into subbasins may be from hatcheries located in other provinces and subbasins. Hatchery releases of anadromous fish, within the geographic range of an ESU/DPS, are listed accordingly.
 
Hatchery / Acclimation Pond Species ESU/DPS Released in 2009 Returns to Collection Facility in 2009 Data as of
Lyons Ferry Hatchery Rainbow Trout 17,270 8 / 30 / 2010
Tucannon Hatchery Rainbow Trout 29,713 8 / 30 / 2010
Recovery Status for ESA-Listed Salmon and Steelhead in the Asotin Subbasin391

Updated : 5/27/2010

Species Population Abundance Threshold Mean Abundance Major Spawning Area Growth Rate Recruits / Spawners Current Viability
Summer Steelhead Asotin Creek 1,000 Data insufficient 3 of 3 Unknown Unknown Moderate
Spring Chinook Asotin Creek 500 Unknown 1 of 1 Unknown Unknown Functionally Extirpated
Limiting Factors in the Asotin Subbasin 391, 393

BULL TROUT
Key Limiting Factor Impairment Habitat Affected Threat Type Threat Name Life Stage(s) Description
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Migration Impediments Juveniles, adults Seasonal water temperatures and poor habitat conditions exclude bull trout use of the mainstem Asotin Creek below the confluence of Charley Creek
Habitat Quantity and Quality Morphological Changes Freshwater - Floodplain Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Impervious Surfaces (Road Density); Riparian Degradation Juveniles, adults Confinement by roads and dikes, and resulting loss of riparian function affect most life stages.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater - Riparian Agricultural Practices; Urbanization; Forest Management Diking; Filling; Impervious Surfaces (Road Density); Riparian Degradation All Channel instability impacts egg incubation throughout the subbasin. Confinement by roads and dikes, and resulting loss of riparian function affect most life stages.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Diking; Wood/Structure Removal Juveniles, adults Lack of habitat diversity and quantity throughout the subbasin are primary factors limiting bull trout.
Water Quality Temperature -- Agricultural Practices; Forest Management; Riparian Degradation All Water temperature may be the most limiting factor for bull trout in the subbasin.
SPRING CHINOOK
Key Limiting Factor Impairment Habitat Affected Threat Type Threat Name Life Stage(s) Description
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability; Morphological Changes Estuary Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Filling; Riparian Degradation; Wetland Loss Smolts Historical complex habitats have been modified through channelization, diking, development and other practices.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Morphological Changes Freshwater - Floodplain Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Impervious Surfaces (Road Density); Riparian Degradation Juveniles, adults Confinement by roads and dikes, and resulting loss of riparian function affect most life stages.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater - Riparian Agricultural Practices; Urbanization; Forest Management Diking; Filling; Impervious Surfaces (Road Density); Riparian Degradation All Channel instability impacts egg incubation throughout the subbasin. Confinement by roads and dikes, and resulting loss of riparian function affect most life stages.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Diking; Wood/Structure Removal Juveniles, adults Lack of habitat diversity and quantity throughout the subbasin are the primary factors limiting spring Chinook.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Fishery Management Harvest Adults Spring Chinook are primarily subject to freshwater harvest.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Migration Impediments Juveniles Juveniles and adults must pass eight mainstem dams
Water Quality Turbidity; Temperature -- Agricultural Practices; Urbanization; Forest Management Diking; Filling; Impervious Surfaces (Road Density); Riparian Degradation; Bank Destabilization All Sediment load impacts egg incubation, and high temperatures limit production.
SUMMER STEELHEAD
Key Limiting Factor Impairment Habitat Affected Threat Type Threat Name Life Stage(s) Description
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability; Morphological Changes Estuary Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Filling; Riparian Degradation; Wetland Loss Smolts Historical complex habitats have been modified through channelization, diking, development and other practices.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Morphological Changes Freshwater - Floodplain Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Impervious Surfaces (Road Density); Riparian Degradation Juveniles Confinement by roads and dikes, and resulting loss of riparian function affect most life stages.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater - Riparian Agricultural Practices; Urbanization; Forest Management Diking; Filling; Impervious Surfaces (Road Density); Riparian Degradation Eggs, juveniles Channel instability impacts egg incubation throughout the subbasin. Confinement by roads and dikes, and resulting loss of riparian function affect most life stages.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Diking; Wood/Structure Removal Juveniles Lack of habitat quantity (pools) and diversity impact steelhead rearing in Hefflefinger and Coombs creeks, as well as most reaches of the South Fork of the North Fork. Habitat diversity and quantity are also the primary limiting factors for the Charley Creek watershed.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Migration Impediments Juveniles Juveniles and adults must pass eight mainstem dams during migration.
Water Quality Turbidity; Temperature -- Agricultural Practices; Urbanization; Forest Management Diking; Filling; Impervious Surfaces (Road Density); Riparian Degradation; Bank Destabilization Eggs, fry, winter parr Sediment load impacts steelhead egg incubation in the mainstem, George Creek, lower South Fork, Ten Mile Creek, and Lick Creek. High temperatures limit steelhead production in Ten Mile Creek.