Province Summary


Columbia Upper Middle Subbasin Summary

The Columbia Upper Middle Subbasin extends from Chief Joseph Dam (Rkm 877, Rm 545.1) to Wanapum Dam (Rkm 669, Rm 415.8) and contains Wells,Rocky Reach, Rock Island and Wanapum dams and reservoirs. Below Chief Joseph Dam, the Columbia River flows in a westerly direction and turns south at the eastern edge of the Cascade Mountains. Several minor tributaries and drainages join this stretch of the Columbia and are included within the UMM Subbasin. These include: Foster, Rock Island, and Moses Coulee creeks in Douglas County; Squilchuck, Stemilt, and Colockum creeks in Chelan County; Trinidad Creek and Sand Hollow Wasteway in Grant County; and Tarpiscan, Tekison, Brushy, Quilomene, Whiskey Dick, and Johnson creeks in Kittitas County. Jameson and Grimes Lakes are also included in this subbasin. The two largest watersheds located within the Subbasin are Foster Creek and Moses Coulee.

Approximately 27% of the subbasin is in federal, state, tribal, and local government ownership, while the remaining 73% is privately owned or owned by non-government organizations (NGOs).

Major land uses in the Subbasin include agriculture, livestock grazing, and suburban development. As the human population in subbasin counties grows, pressure on natural resources intensifies. Two cities with populations over 10,000 residents and numerous small towns are distributed throughout the Subbasin.

Source: Upper Mid-Columbia Subbasin Plan

Status and Trends of Focal Species in Columbia Upper Middle Subbasin
 
Species ESU MPG Population Biological Objective (s) Biological Status Federal Status Data / Charts
Spring Chinook Upper Columbia  Wenatchee-Methow  Wenatchee, Entiat, Methow  Subbasin Plan Objective :
None
 
Adult Counts (Rock Island Dam)
2017: 8,080 adults 60
Endangered Status & Trends
Summer Chinook Upper Columbia      Subbasin Plan Objective :
None
 
Adult Counts (Rock Island Dam)
2017: 56,265 adults 60
Not Listed Status & Trends
Summer Steelhead Upper Columbia  Wenatchee-Methow  Wenatchee, Entiat, Mehtow  Subbasin Plan Objective :
None
 
Adult Counts (Rock Island Dam)
2017: 7,639 adults (mixed)60
Threatened Status & Trends
Rainbow Trout       Subbasin Plan Objective :
None
 
Unknown Species of Concern No Data
    
View abundance data for Columbia Upper Middle Subbasin
 
Hatcheries located in Columbia Upper Middle Subbasin
**Hatchery data will be updated in 2016**

Hatchery / Acclimation Pond Hatchery Info Releases / Returns Program Reviews(APRE / HSRG / HGMP / USFWS) Map
Chelan PUD Hatchery View View    
Chelan State Fish Hatchery View View View View
Dryden Rearing Ponds View View View View
Eastbank Hatchery View View View View
Lake Wenatchee Net Pens View View View View
Rocky Reach Hatchery View   View View
Turtle Rock Hatchery View View View View
Wells Hatchery View View View View
 
Hatchery Releases and Returns to Columbia Upper Middle Subbasin359, 360, 363
**Hatchery data will be updated in 2016**

Some releases into subbasins may be from hatcheries located in other provinces and subbasins. Hatchery releases of anadromous fish, within the geographic range of an ESU/DPS, are listed accordingly.
 
Hatchery / Acclimation Pond Species ESU/DPS Released in 2009 Returns to Collection Facility in 2009 Data as of
Chelan PUD Hatchery Rainbow Trout 7,414 8 / 30 / 2010
Chelan State Fish Hatchery Brown Trout 6,300 8 / 30 / 2010
Rainbow Trout 135,532 8 / 30 / 2010
Summer Chinook 23,940 8 / 30 / 2010
Tiger Trout 5,000 8 / 30 / 2010
Columbia Basin Hatchery Rainbow Trout 41,095 8 / 30 / 2010
Westslope Cutthroat 7,005 8 / 30 / 2010
Lake Wenatchee Net Pens Sockeye 154,772 8 / 30 / 2010
Spring Chinook Upper Columbia River Spring Chinook ESU 132,434 8 / 30 / 2010
Trout Lodge Commercial Rainbow Trout 1,436 8 / 30 / 2010
Turtle Rock Hatchery Summer Chinook 742,326 8 / 30 / 2010
Wells Hatchery Coho 44,420 8 / 30 / 2010
Rainbow Trout 100 8 / 30 / 2010
Summer Chinook 737,194 4,228 (mixed) 8 / 30 / 2010
Recovery Status for ESA-Listed Salmon and Steelhead in the Columbia Upper Middle Subbasin

    No recovery status for Columbia Upper Middle subbasin.
Limiting Factors in the Columbia Upper Middle Subbasin

RAINBOW TROUT
Key Limiting Factor Impairment Habitat Affected Threat Type Threat Name Life Stage(s) Description
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices Riparian Degradation; Bank Destabilization Juveniles Steep, sparsely vegetated shorelines limit rearing habitat.
Instantaneous Mortality Predation -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Predators: Fish; Predators: Avian Juveniles Introductions of non-native predator fishes as well as an increase in populations of indigenous predator fish species, and the immigration of diving birds are potentially limiting survival of juvenile salmonids.
Sediment Conditions Increased Sediment Quantity Freshwater-Instream Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Sediment: Retention Adult spawners Smoothing of the hydrograph and lack of significant reservoir fluctuations has resulted in an increased amount of fine sediment in the lower portions of the reservoirs thus concentrating anadromous salmonid spawning to the upper reaches of the reservoirs.
Water Quality Oxygen -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Water: Temperature and Gas Alteration; Pollution and Contamination Juveniles Occasionally total dissolved gas levels exceed maximum allowed levels during periods of high run-off. Mean annual phosphate concentrations often exceed levels that could stimulate algal blooms.
Water Quantity Altered Flow Timing -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Water: Storage or Withdrawal; Water: Hydrologic Cycle Alteration Juveniles Operation of Wanapum, Rock Island, Rocky Reach, Wells, and Chief Joseph dams results in rapid flushing rates and no thermal stratification during the summer. Productivity is limited due to rapid flushing rates, cold temperatures, and lack of shallow water areas. Food that is available in the reservoirs typically provides lower amounts of energy than found in free-flowing areas such as the Hanford Reach.
SPRING CHINOOK
Key Limiting Factor Impairment Habitat Affected Threat Type Threat Name Life Stage(s) Description
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability; Morphological Changes Estuary Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Filling; Riparian Degradation; Wetland Loss Smolts Historical complex habitats have been modified through channelization, diking, development and other practices.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices Riparian Degradation; Bank Destabilization Juveniles Steep, sparsely vegetated shorelines limit rearing habitat.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Migration Impediments Juveniles, adults Juveniles and adults must pass eight mainstem dams during migration.
Instantaneous Mortality Predation -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Predators: Fish; Predators: Avian Juveniles Introductions of non-native predator fishes as well as an increase in populations of indigenous predator fish species, and the immigration of diving birds are potentially limiting survival of juvenile salmonids.
Sediment Conditions Increased Sediment Quantity Freshwater-Instream Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Sediment: Retention Adult spawners Smoothing of the hydrograph and lack of significant reservoir fluctuations has resulted in an increased amount of fine sediment in the lower portions of the reservoirs thus concentrating anadromous salmonid spawning to the upper reaches of the reservoirs.
Water Quality Oxygen -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Water: Temperature and Gas Alteration; Pollution and Contamination Juveniles Occasionally total dissolved gas levels exceed maximum allowed levels during periods of high run-off. Mean annual phosphate concentrations often exceed levels that could stimulate algal blooms.
Water Quantity Altered Flow Timing -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Water: Storage or Withdrawal; Water: Hydrologic Cycle Alteration Juveniles Operation of Wanapum, Rock Island, Rocky Reach, Wells, and Chief Joseph dams results in rapid flushing rates and no thermal stratification during the summer. Productivity is limited due to rapid flushing rates, cold temperatures, and lack of shallow water areas. Food that is available in the reservoirs typically provides lower amounts of energy than found in free-flowing areas such as the Hanford Reach.
SUMMER CHINOOK
Key Limiting Factor Impairment Habitat Affected Threat Type Threat Name Life Stage(s) Description
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability; Morphological Changes Estuary Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Filling; Riparian Degradation; Wetland Loss Smolts Historical complex habitats have been modified through channelization, diking, development and other practices.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Migration Impediments Juveniles, adults Juveniles and adults must pass eight mainstem dams during migration.
Instantaneous Mortality Predation -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Predators: Fish; Predators: Avian Juveniles Introductions of non-native predator fishes as well as an increase in populations of indigenous predator fish species, and the immigration of diving birds are potentially limiting survival of juvenile salmonids.
Sediment Conditions Increased Sediment Quantity Freshwater-Instream Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Sediment: Retention Adult spawners Smoothing of the hydrograph and lack of significant reservoir fluctuations has resulted in an increased amount of fine sediment in the lower portions of the reservoirs thus concentrating anadromous salmonid spawning to the upper reaches of the reservoirs.
Water Quality Oxygen -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Water: Temperature and Gas Alteration; Pollution and Contamination Juveniles Occasionally total dissolved gas levels exceed maximum allowed levels during periods of high run-off. Mean annual phosphate concentrations often exceed levels that could stimulate algal blooms.
Water Quantity Altered Flow Timing -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Water: Storage or Withdrawal; Water: Hydrologic Cycle Alteration Juveniles Operation of Wanapum, Rock Island, Rocky Reach, Wells, and Chief Joseph dams results in rapid flushing rates and no thermal stratification during the summer. Productivity is limited due to rapid flushing rates, cold temperatures, and lack of shallow water areas. Food that is available in the reservoirs typically provides lower amounts of energy than found in free-flowing areas such as the Hanford Reach.
SUMMER STEELHEAD
Key Limiting Factor Impairment Habitat Affected Threat Type Threat Name Life Stage(s) Description
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability; Morphological Changes Estuary Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Filling; Riparian Degradation; Wetland Loss Smolts Historical complex habitats have been modified through channelization, diking, development and other practices.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Migration Impediments Juveniles, adults Juveniles and adults must pass eight mainstem dams during migration.
Instantaneous Mortality Predation -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Predators: Fish; Predators: Avian Juveniles Introductions of non-native predator fishes as well as an increase in populations of indigenous predator fish species, and the immigration of diving birds are potentially limiting survival of juvenile salmonids.
Sediment Conditions Increased Sediment Quantity Freshwater-Instream Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Sediment: Retention Adult spawners Smoothing of the hydrograph and lack of significant reservoir fluctuations has resulted in an increased amount of fine sediment in the lower portions of the reservoirs thus concentrating anadromous salmonid spawning to the upper reaches of the reservoirs.
Water Quality Oxygen -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Water: Temperature and Gas Alteration; Pollution and Contamination Juveniles Occasionally total dissolved gas levels exceed maximum allowed levels during periods of high run-off. Mean annual phosphate concentrations often exceed levels that could stimulate algal blooms.
Water Quantity Altered Flow Timing -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Water: Storage or Withdrawal; Water: Hydrologic Cycle Alteration Juveniles Operation of Wanapum, Rock Island, Rocky Reach, Wells, and Chief Joseph dams results in rapid flushing rates and no thermal stratification during the summer. Productivity is limited due to rapid flushing rates, cold temperatures, and lack of shallow water areas. Food that is available in the reservoirs typically provides lower amounts of energy than found in free-flowing areas such as the Hanford Reach.