Province Summary


Methow Subbasin Summary

The Methow is comprised mostly of large tracts of relatively pristine habitat. Topography varies from mountainous alpine terrain at elevations over 8,500 feet to gently sloping wide valleys down to an elevation of 800 feet. This diverse habitat supports well over 300 species of fish and wildlife - many of which are listed as Endangered, Threatened or as Species of Concern.

Many of the 5,000 people who live within the Methow are seasonal residents with the majority of permanent residents involved with service-based industries. Recreation, tourism, and related development are playing an increasing role in the area’s economy with historic economic generators such as logging, mining, farming and ranching on the decline Private land holdings comprise roughly 10% of the subbasin with the remainder largely owned by the federal government. The needs and activities of humans have, in some instances, resulted in habitat disturbances and the associated need to protect targeted portions of remaining habitat and restore disturbed habitat.

Source: Methow Subbasin Plan

Status and Trends of Focal Species in Methow Subbasin
 
Species ESU MPG Population Biological Objective (s) Biological Status Federal Status Data / Charts
Spring Chinook Upper Columbia  Wenatchee-Methow  Methow  Recovery Plan Criteria :
2,000 natural adults295
 
NOSA Estimate
2017: 176 spawners474
Adult Escapement (natural)
2011: 1,344 adults (natural)177
Adult Counts (hatchery)
2016: 5,475 adults (hatchery)56
Redd Counts (natural)
2014: 898 redds (natural)178, 179, 180, 474
Endangered Status & Trends
Summer/Fall Chinook Upper Columbia      Subbasin Plan Objective :
3,500 adults past Wells Dam296
 
Adult Escapement
2011: 2,917 adults 58
Redd Counts (natural)
2011: 941 redds (natural)58
Not Listed Status & Trends
Coho       Subbasin Plan Objective :
None
 
Adult Counts
2016: 241 adults 54
Not Listed Status & Trends
Summer Steelhead Upper Columbia  Wenatchee-Methow  Methow  Recovery Plan Criteria :
1,000 natural adults295
 
NOSA Estimate
2017: 469 spawners474
Juvenile Outmigrants
2016: 17,639 juveniles474
Threatened Status & Trends
Bull Trout Methow (Within the Upper Columbia River Recovery Unit)    Gold Creek, Twisp River, Chewuch River, Wolf Creek, Early Winters Creek, Upper Methow River, Lost River, Goat Creek  Draft Recovery Plan Criteria :
3,610 - 5,886 fish294
 
Redd Counts
2011: 161 redds 198
Threatened Status & Trends
Westslope Cutthroat       Subbasin Plan Objective :
None
 
Unknown Species of Concern No Data
    
View abundance data for Methow Subbasin
 
Hatcheries located in Methow Subbasin
**Hatchery data will be updated in 2016**

Hatchery / Acclimation Pond Hatchery Info Releases / Returns Program Reviews(APRE / HSRG / HGMP / USFWS) Map
Carleton Pond View View View View
Chewuch Pond View View View View
Methow Hatchery View View View View
Twisp Rearing Pond View View View View
Winthrop National Fish Hatchery View View View View
 
Hatchery Releases and Returns to Methow Subbasin359, 360
**Hatchery data will be updated in 2016**

Some releases into subbasins may be from hatcheries located in other provinces and subbasins. Hatchery releases of anadromous fish, within the geographic range of an ESU/DPS, are listed accordingly.
 
Hatchery / Acclimation Pond Species ESU/DPS Released in 2009 Returns to Collection Facility in 2009 Data as of
Carleton Pond Summer Chinook 433,256 8 / 30 / 2010
Chewuch Pond Spring Chinook Upper Columbia River Spring Chinook ESU 126,055 8 / 30 / 2010
Methow Hatchery Spring Chinook Upper Columbia River Spring Chinook ESU 119,407 705 (mixed) 8 / 30 / 2010
Twisp Rearing Pond Coho 48,289 8 / 30 / 2010
Spring Chinook Upper Columbia River Spring Chinook ESU 54,244 8 / 30 / 2010
Wells Hatchery Summer Steelhead Upper Columbia River Steelhead DPS 308,512 980 (mixed) 8 / 30 / 2010
Winthrop National Fish Hatchery Coho 376,393 8 / 30 / 2010
Spring Chinook Upper Columbia River Spring Chinook ESU 371,959 8 / 30 / 2010
Summer Steelhead Upper Columbia River Steelhead DPS 102,418 8 / 30 / 2010
Recovery Status for ESA-Listed Salmon and Steelhead in the Methow Subbasin421, 402

Updated : 5/27/2010

Species Population Abundance Threshold Mean Abundance Major Spawning Area Growth Rate Recruits / Spawners Current Viability
Summer Steelhead Methow 1,500 202 (1991-2002) 4 of 4 Unknown 0.09-0.84 (1985-96) Low
Spring Chinook Methow 2,000 205 (1995-2004) 3 of 4 1.10 0.88 (1979-98) Low
Limiting Factors in the Methow Subbasin 402, 404

Bull Trout
Key Limiting Factor Impairment Habitat Affected Threat Type Threat Name Life Stage(s) Description
Food Competition -- Species Management Species Introduction Juveniles, adults Introduction of brook trout threatens bull trout through competition and hybridization.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management; Urbanization; Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Migration Impediments Juveniles, adults Two passage barriers (culverts) exist in the lower 3.5 miles of the Black Canyon/Squaw Creek. Methow Valley Irrigation District canal diversion and culverts are impediments in the Lower Twisp. Flow diversions are present in the Lower Chewuch River as well as culverts in Cub and Little Boulder creeks (Lower Chewuch River). A road confinement velocity barrier exists in Eightmile Creek.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management; Urbanization Riparian Degradation; Bank Destabilization Juveniles, adults Lack of large woody debris exists throughout the subbasin as well as high embeddedness in spawning habitat. There has been a loss of quality pools and large woody debris in Little Boulder Creek and the gorge in Goat Creek.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Riparian Agricultural Practices; Forest Management; Urbanization Riparian Degradation Juveniles, adults Loss of riparian vegetation is prevalent throughout the subbasin.
Instantaneous Mortality Predation -- Species Management Species Introduction Juveniles, adults Walleye and smallmouth bass prey on salmonids.
Sediment Conditions Increased Sediment Quantity Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Impervious Surfaces; Sediment: Bank Destabilization; All Increased sediment load and high percentage of fines exists in the depositional areas. Increased sediment load below Buttermilk Creek (Lower Twisp) is problematic.
Water Quantity Increased Water Quantity; Decreased Water Quantity -- Forest Management Water: Storage or Withdrawal Juveniles, adults Increased peak flows and increased flashy flows exist due to fires in the headwaters. Low flows persist due to natural losing at river mile 0-4.3 on Wolf Creek.
Coho
Key Limiting Factor Impairment Habitat Affected Threat Type Threat Name Life Stage(s) Description
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability; Morphological Changes Estuary Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Filling; Riparian Degradation; Wetland Loss Smolts Historical complex habitats have been modified through channelization, diking, development and other practices.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Decreased Water Quantity; Morphological Changes Freshwater - Floodplain Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Impervious Surfaces; Riparian Degradation Juveniles Loss of connection to the floodplain due to roads and riprap in the first reach of Early Winters Creek and Lost River. High road densities exist in Little Bridge, Poorman, and Buttermilk creeks. Loss of connection to the floodplain in the lower 800 feet of Wolf Creek and the loss of riparian vegetation in the lower mile of Goat Creek/Little Boulder limit productivity.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Riparian Agricultural Practices; Forest Management; Urbanization Riparian Degradation Juveniles Loss of riparian vegetation is prevalent throughout the subbasin.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management; Urbanization Riparian Degradation; Bank Destabilization Juveniles Lack of large woody debris exists throughout the subbasin as well as high embeddedness in spawning habitat. There has been a loss of quality pools and large woody debris in Little Boulder Creek and the gorge in Goat Creek.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Fishery Management Harvest Adults Coho are subject to ocean and fresh water harvest.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Migration Impediments Juveniles Juveniles and adults must pass nine mainstem dams during migration.
Sediment Conditions Increased Sediment Quantity Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Impervious Surfaces; Sediment: Bank Destabilization; All Increased sediment load and high percentage of fines exists in the depositional areas. Increased sediment load below Buttermilk Creek (Lower Twisp) is problematic.
SPRING CHINOOK
Key Limiting Factor Impairment Habitat Affected Threat Type Threat Name Life Stage(s) Description
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management; Urbanization; Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Migration Impediments Juveniles, adults Two passage barriers (culverts) exist in the lower 3.5 miles of the Black Canyon/Squaw Creek. Methow Valley Irrigation District canal diversion and culverts are impediments in the Lower Twisp. Flow diversions are present in the Lower Chewuch River as well as culverts in Cub and Little Boulder creeks (Lower Chewuch River). A road confinement velocity barrier exists in Eightmile Creek.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability; Morphological Changes Estuary Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Filling; Riparian Degradation; Wetland Loss Smolts Historical complex habitats have been modified through channelization, diking, development and other practices.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Decreased Water Quantity; Morphological Changes Freshwater - Floodplain Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Impervious Surfaces; Riparian Degradation Juveniles Loss of connection to the floodplain due to roads and riprap in the first reach of Early Winters Creek and Lost River. High road densities exist in Little Bridge, Poorman, and Buttermilk creeks. Loss of connection to the floodplain in the lower 800 feet of Wolf Creek and the loss of riparian vegetation in the lower mile of Goat Creek/Little Boulder limit productivity.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Riparian Agricultural Practices; Forest Management; Urbanization Riparian Degradation Juveniles Loss of riparian vegetation is prevalent throughout the subbasin.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management; Urbanization Riparian Degradation; Bank Destabilization Juveniles Lack of large woody debris exists throughout the subbasin as well as high embeddedness in spawning habitat. There has been a loss of quality pools and large woody debris in Little Boulder Creek and the gorge in Goat Creek.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Fishery Management Harvest Adults Spring Chinook are subject to fresh water harvest.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Migration Impediments Juveniles Juveniles and adults must pass nine mainstem dams during migration.
Instantaneous Mortality Competition; Pathogens -- Artificial Propagation Hatchery Fish Production; Disease Amplification and Transfer Juveniles Competition, genetic introgression, and disease transmission from hatchery introductions may reduce productivity.
Instantaneous Mortality Predation -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management; Species Management Predators: Fish; Predators: Avian; Predators: Marine Mammal Juveniles Avian and pinniped predation are concerns. Walleye and smallmouth bass prey on salmonids.
Sediment Conditions Increased Sediment Quantity Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Impervious Surfaces; Sediment: Bank Destabilization; Juveniles Increased sediment load and high percentage of fines exists in the depositional areas. Water temperatures limit spring Chinook spawning and incubation from river mile 0-4 in the Lower Twisp. Increased sediment load below Buttermilk Creek (Lower Twisp) is problematic.
Summer Chinook
Key Limiting Factor Impairment Habitat Affected Threat Type Threat Name Life Stage(s) Description
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management; Urbanization; Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Migration Impediments Juveniles, adults Two passage barriers (culverts) exist in the lower 3.5 miles of the Black Canyon/Squaw Creek. Methow Valley Irrigation District canal diversion and culverts are impediments in the Lower Twisp. Flow diversions are present in the Lower Chewuch River as well as culverts in Cub and Little Boulder creeks (Lower Chewuch River). A road confinement velocity barrier exists in Eightmile Creek.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability; Morphological Changes Estuary Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Filling; Riparian Degradation; Wetland Loss Smolts Historical complex habitats have been modified through channelization, diking, development and other practices.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Decreased Water Quantity; Morphological Changes Freshwater - Floodplain Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Impervious Surfaces; Riparian Degradation Juveniles Loss of connection to the floodplain due to roads and riprap in the first reach of Early Winters Creek and Lost River. High road densities exist in Little Bridge, Poorman, and Buttermilk creeks. Loss of connection to the floodplain in the lower 800 feet of Wolf Creek and the loss of riparian vegetation in the lower mile of Goat Creek/Little Boulder limit productivity.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Riparian Agricultural Practices; Forest Management; Urbanization Riparian Degradation Juveniles Loss of riparian vegetation is prevalent throughout the subbasin.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management; Urbanization Riparian Degradation; Bank Destabilization Juveniles Lack of large woody debris exists throughout the subbasin as well as high embeddedness in spawning habitat. There has been a loss of quality pools and large woody debris in Little Boulder Creek and the gorge in Goat Creek.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Fishery Management Harvest Adults Spring Chinook are subject to fresh water harvest.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Migration Impediments Juveniles Juveniles and adults must pass nine mainstem dams during migration.
Instantaneous Mortality Competition; Pathogens -- Artificial Propagation Hatchery Fish Production; Disease Amplification and Transfer Juveniles Competition, genetic introgression, and disease transmission from hatchery introductions may reduce productivity.
Instantaneous Mortality Predation -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management; Species Management Predators: Fish; Predators: Avian; Predators: Marine Mammal Juveniles Avian and pinniped predation are concerns. Walleye and smallmouth bass prey on salmonids.
Sediment Conditions Increased Sediment Quantity Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Impervious Surfaces; Sediment: Bank Destabilization; Juveniles Increased sediment load and high percentage of fines exists in the depositional areas. Water temperatures limit spring Chinook spawning and incubation from river mile 0-4 in the Lower Twisp. Increased sediment load below Buttermilk Creek (Lower Twisp) is problematic.
SUMMER STEELHEAD
Key Limiting Factor Impairment Habitat Affected Threat Type Threat Name Life Stage(s) Description
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management; Urbanization; Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Migration Impediments Juveniles, adults Two passage barriers (culverts) exist in the lower 3.5 miles of the Black Canyon/Squaw Creek. Methow Valley Irrigation District canal diversion and culverts are impediments in the Lower Twisp. Flow diversions are present in the Lower Chewuch River as well as culverts in Cub and Little Boulder creeks (Lower Chewuch River). A road confinement velocity barrier exists in Eightmile Creek.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability; Morphological Changes Estuary Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Filling; Riparian Degradation; Wetland Loss Smolts Historical complex habitats have been modified through channelization, diking, development and other practices.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Decreased Water Quantity; Morphological Changes Freshwater - Floodplain Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Impervious Surfaces; Riparian Degradation Juveniles Loss of connection to the floodplain due to roads and riprap in the first reach of Early Winters Creek and Lost River. High road densities exist in Little Bridge, Poorman, and Buttermilk creeks. Loss of connection to the floodplain in the lower 800 feet of Wolf Creek and the loss of riparian vegetation in the lower mile of Goat Creek/Little Boulder limit productivity.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Riparian Agricultural Practices; Forest Management; Urbanization Riparian Degradation Juveniles Loss of riparian vegetation is prevalent throughout the subbasin.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management; Urbanization Riparian Degradation; Bank Destabilization Juveniles Lack of large woody debris exists throughout the subbasin as well as high embeddedness in spawning habitat. There has been a loss of quality pools and large woody debris in Little Boulder Creek and the gorge in Goat Creek.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Migration Impediments Juveniles Juveniles and adults must pass nine mainstem dams during migration.
Instantaneous Mortality Competition; Pathogens -- Artificial Propagation Hatchery Fish Production; Disease Amplification and Transfer Juveniles Competition, genetic introgression, and disease transmission from hatchery introductions may reduce productivity.
Instantaneous Mortality Predation -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management; Species Management Predators: Fish; Predators: Avian; Predators: Marine Mammal Juveniles Avian and pinniped predation are concerns. Walleye and smallmouth bass prey on salmonids.
Sediment Conditions Increased Sediment Quantity Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Impervious Surfaces; Sediment: Bank Destabilization; Juveniles Increased sediment load and high percentage of fines exists in the depositional areas. Water temperatures limit spring Chinook spawning and incubation from river mile 0-4 in the Lower Twisp. Increased sediment load below Buttermilk Creek (Lower Twisp) is problematic.
WESTSLOPE CUTTHROAT
Key Limiting Factor Impairment Habitat Affected Threat Type Threat Name Life Stage(s) Description
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management; Urbanization; Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Migration Impediments Juveniles, adults Two passage barriers (culverts) exist in the lower 3.5 miles of the Black Canyon/Squaw Creek. Methow Valley Irrigation District canal diversion and culverts are impediments in the Lower Twisp. Flow diversions are present in the Lower Chewuch River as well as culverts in Cub and Little Boulder creeks (Lower Chewuch River). A road confinement velocity barrier exists in Eightmile Creek.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management; Urbanization Riparian Degradation; Bank Destabilization Juveniles, adults Lack of large woody debris exists throughout the subbasin as well as high embeddedness in spawning habitat. There has been a loss of quality pools and large woody debris in Little Boulder Creek and the gorge in Goat Creek.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Riparian Agricultural Practices; Forest Management; Urbanization Riparian Degradation Juveniles, adults Loss of riparian vegetation is prevalent throughout the subbasin.
Sediment Conditions Increased Sediment Quantity Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Impervious Surfaces; Sediment: Bank Destabilization; All Increased sediment load and high percentage of fines exists in the depositional areas. Increased sediment load below Buttermilk Creek (Lower Twisp) is problematic.
Water Quantity Increased Water Quantity; Decreased Water Quantity -- Forest Management Water: Storage or Withdrawal Juveniles, adults Increased peak flows and increased flashy flows exist due to fires in the headwaters. Low flows persist due to natural losing at river mile 0-4.3 on Wolf Creek.