Province Summary


Tucannon Subbasin Summary

The Tucannon Subbasin encompasses 503 square miles in Garfield and Columbia counties drained by the Tucannon River and its tributaries. Pataha Creek is the Tucannon»s major tributary. The Tucannon arises in the Blue Mountains and enters the Snake River at River Mile 62.2 near the mouth of the Palouse River. The area has an average annual rainfall of 23 inches which includes winter snowfall. Melting snow from the Blue Mountains provides much of the annual runoff to the streams and rivers in the subbasin; the water level in many streams diminishes greatly during the summer months. Vegetation in the subbasin is characterized by grasslands and agricultural lands at lower elevations and evergreen forests at higher elevations.

Major land uses in the subbasin are related to agriculture; cropland, forest, rangeland, pasture, and hay production account for more than 90 percent of the land within the watershed. Approximately 75 percent of the Tucannon subbasin is in private ownership; most of this land is in the lower portion of the watershed.

Source: Tucannon Subbasin Plan

Status and Trends of Focal Species in Tucannon Subbasin
 
Species ESU MPG Population Biological Objective (s) Biological Status Federal Status Data / Charts
Fall Chinook Snake River  Snake River  Snake River  Subbasin Plan Objective :
14,300 Natural adults314
2,000 adults315
Recovery Plan Criteria :
3,000 natural adults (entire population) 286
 
Adult Counts
2011: 2,044 adults81
Redd Counts (mixed)
2011: 302 redds (mixed)196
Threatened Status & Trends
Spring Chinook Snake River  Lower Snake River  Tucannon  Subbasin Plan Objective :
2,000 natural adults104
3,000 total adults315,314 Recovery Plan Criteria :
750 natural adults 286
 
NOSA Estimate
2017: 49 spawners 474
Redd Counts (mixed)
2014: 124 redds 82
Threatened Status & Trends
Summer Steelhead Snake River  Lower Snake River  Tucannon  Subbasin Plan Objective :
948 natural-origin adults315
600 adults (existing habitat conditions) and 2,200-3,400 (future) adult escapement315
2,200 adults314
3,400 adults315
Recovery Plan Criteria :
1,000 natural spawners286
 
Adult Escapement (natural)
2007: 137 spawners (natural)149
Juvenile Outmigrants
2017: 20,391 juvenile474
Threatened Status & Trends
Bull Trout Tucannon (Within Snake River Washington Recovery Unit)      Draft Recovery Plan Criteria :
1,000 adults512
 
Redd Counts
2011: 143 redds 83
Threatened Status & Trends
    
View abundance data for Tucannon Subbasin
 
Hatcheries located in Tucannon Subbasin
**Hatchery data will be updated in 2016**

Hatchery / Acclimation Pond Hatchery Info Releases / Returns Program Reviews(APRE / HSRG / HGMP / USFWS) Map
Curl Lake Rearing Pond View View View View
Dayton Rearing Ponds View View View View
Lyons Ferry Hatchery View View View View
Tucannon Hatchery View View View View
 
Hatchery Releases and Returns to Tucannon Subbasin363, 360
**Hatchery data will be updated in 2016**

Some releases into subbasins may be from hatcheries located in other provinces and subbasins. Hatchery releases of anadromous fish, within the geographic range of an ESU/DPS, are listed accordingly.
 
Hatchery / Acclimation Pond Species ESU/DPS Released in 2009 Returns to Collection Facility in 2009 Data as of
Cottonwood Creek Rearing Pond Summer Steelhead Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS 170,232 2,313 8 / 30 / 2010
Curl Lake Rearing Pond Spring Chinook Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook ESU 114,681 8 / 30 / 2010
Dayton Rearing Ponds Summer Steelhead Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS 86,115 26 8 / 30 / 2010
Lyons Ferry Hatchery Fall Chinook Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook ESU 655,847 4,389 8 / 30 / 2010
Rainbow Trout 31,979 8 / 30 / 2010
Summer Steelhead Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS 279,996 1,766 8 / 30 / 2010
Summer Steelhead Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS 49,626 8 / 30 / 2010
Tucannon Hatchery Rainbow Trout 55,131 8 / 30 / 2010
Spring Chinook Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook ESU 192 8 / 30 / 2010
Summer Steelhead Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS 250 8 / 30 / 2010
Recovery Status for ESA-Listed Salmon and Steelhead in the Tucannon Subbasin376, 391

Updated : 5/27/2010

Species Population Abundance Threshold Mean Abundance Major Spawning Area Growth Rate Recruits / Spawners Current Viability
Summer Steelhead Tucannon 1,000 177 (1986-2001) 1 of 1 Unknown Unknown Low
Spring Chinook Tucannon 750 88 (1994-2003) 1 of 1 1.00 0.86 (1979-98) Low
Limiting Factors in the Tucannon Subbasin 391, 392, 393

BULL TROUT
Key Limiting Factor Impairment Habitat Affected Threat Type Threat Name Life Stage(s) Description
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices Migration Impediments Juveniles, adults Obstructions exist in Pataha Creek at river miles 1.3, 10.8, 25.7, 35.2, and 43.8. Additional obstructions exist at river mile 1.1. and 0.4 in Bihmaier Gulch and Dry Pataha creeks, respectively. Obstructions exist in the Tucannon River at river mile 5.5, 13.5, 16, 38.4, and 43. The Marengo-Tumalum geographic area contains several locations where diversion screens are absent or ineffective.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Riparian Agricultural Practices Riparian Degradation Juveniles, adults Connections among the floodplain, riparian vegetation, and off-channel vegetation have been lost.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices Riparian Degradation; Bank Destabilization Juveniles, adults Lack of large woody debris and pools limit productivity.
Sediment Conditions Increased Sediment Quantity Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Sediment: Bank Destabilization; Eggs, juveniles Sediment load impacts egg incubation and early life history stages. Marginal summer temperatures affect all life stages.
Water Quality Temperature -- Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Riparian Degradation All Marginal summer temperatures affect all life stages.
Water Quantity Decreased Water Quantity; Increased Water Quantity -- Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Riparian Degradation; Wood/Structure Removal; Water: Runoff Coefficient Alteration Juveniles, adults Increased peak flows and reduced low flows, resulting from upland canopy removal, poor riparian conditions and loss of ground cover in the uplands, limit fry colonization and juvenile rearing life stages.
FALL CHINOOK
Key Limiting Factor Impairment Habitat Affected Threat Type Threat Name Life Stage(s) Description
Biological Viability Criteria Diversity -- Artificial Propogation Straying Adult spawners Large numbers of stray fall Chinook spawning with indigenous populations pose serious genetic risks.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability; Morphological Changes Estuary Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Filling; Riparian Degradation; Wetland Loss Smolts Historical complex habitats have been modified through channelization, diking, development and other practices.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Morphological Changes Freshwater-Floodplain Erosion Control; Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Impervious Surfaces (Road Density); Riparian Degradation Juveniles Connections among the floodplain, riparian vegetation, and off-channel vegetation have been lost.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Riparian Agricultural Practices Diking; Filling; Riparian Degradation Juveniles Connections among the floodplain, riparian vegetation, and off-channel vegetation have been lost.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Diking; Filling; Wood/Structure Removal; Wetland Loss Fry Lack of large woody debris and pools limit productivity.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Fishery Management Harvest Adults Fall Chinook are subject to both ocean and freshwater harvest.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Migration Impediments Juveniles Juveniles and adults must pass six dams during migration.
Instantaneous Mortality Predation -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management; Species Management Predators: Fish; Predators: Avian Juveniles Predation, especially within reservoirs, is a primary limiting factor.
Sediment Conditions Increased Sediment Quantity Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Sediment: Bank Destabilization; Sediment: Upland Disturbance Eggs, fry Increased sediment load is problematic for fall Chinook. Sediment load impacts egg incubation and early life history stages.
Water Quantity Decreased Water Quantity; Increased Water Quantity -- Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Riparian Degradation; Wood/Structure Removal; Water: Runoff Coefficient Alteration Juveniles, adults Increased peak flows and reduced low flows, resulting from upland canopy removal, poor riparian conditions and loss of ground cover in the uplands, limit fry colonization and juvenile rearing life stages.
SPRING CHINOOK
Key Limiting Factor Impairment Habitat Affected Threat Type Threat Name Life Stage(s) Description
Biological Viability Criteria Diversity -- Artificial Propogation Straying Adult spawners Large numbers of stray spring Chinook spawning with indigenous populations pose serious genetic risks.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices Migration Impediments Juveniles Obstructions exist in the Tucannon River at river mile 5.5, 13.5, 16, 38.4, and 43. The Marengo-Tumalum geographic area contains several locations where diversion screens are absent or ineffective.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability; Morphological Changes Estuary Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Filling; Riparian Degradation; Wetland Loss Smolts Historical complex habitats have been modified through channelization, diking, development and other practices.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Morphological Changes Freshwater-Floodplain Erosion Control; Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Impervious Surfaces (Road Density); Riparian Degradation Juveniles Connections among the floodplain, riparian vegetation, and off-channel vegetation have been lost.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Riparian Agricultural Practices Diking; Filling; Riparian Degradation Juveniles Connections among the floodplain, riparian vegetation, and off-channel vegetation have been lost.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Diking; Filling; Wood/Structure Removal; Wetland Loss Fry Lack of large woody debris and pools limit productivity.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Fishery Management Harvest Adults Spring Chinook are subject to freshwater harvest.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Migration Impediments Juveniles Juveniles and adults must pass six dams during migration.
Instantaneous Mortality Predation -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management; Species Management Predators: Fish; Predators: Avian Juveniles Predation, especially within reservoirs, is a primary limiting factor.
Water Quality Temperature -- Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Riparian Degradation All Elevated summer water temperatures are a problem for spawning (pre-spawn holding) and egg incubation for spring Chinook. Marginal summer temperatures affect juvenile rearing for spring Chinook.
Water Quantity Decreased Water Quantity; Increased Water Quantity -- Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Riparian Degradation; Wood/Structure Removal; Water: Runoff Coefficient Alteration Juveniles, adults Increased peak flows and reduced low flows, resulting from upland canopy removal, poor riparian conditions and loss of ground cover in the uplands, limit fry colonization and juvenile rearing life stages.
SUMMER STEELHEAD
Key Limiting Factor Impairment Habitat Affected Threat Type Threat Name Life Stage(s) Description
Biological Viability Criteria Diversity -- Artificial Propogation Straying Adult spawners Large numbers of stray spring Chinook spawning with indigenous populations pose serious genetic risks.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices Migration Impediments Juveniles, adults Obstructions exist in Pataha Creek at river miles 1.3, 10.8, 25.7, 35.2, and 43.8. Additional obstructions exist at river mile 1.1. and 0.4 in Bihmaier Gulch and Dry Pataha creeks, respectively. Obstructions exist in the Tucannon River at river mile 5.5, 13.5, 16, 38.4, and 43. The Marengo-Tumalum geographic area contains several locations where diversion screens are absent or ineffective.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability; Morphological Changes Estuary Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Filling; Riparian Degradation; Wetland Loss Smolts Historical complex habitats have been modified through channelization, diking, development and other practices.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Morphological Changes Freshwater-Floodplain Erosion Control; Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Impervious Surfaces (Road Density); Riparian Degradation Juveniles Connections among the floodplain, riparian vegetation, and off-channel vegetation have been lost.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Riparian Agricultural Practices Diking; Filling; Riparian Degradation Juveniles Connections among the floodplain, riparian vegetation, and off-channel vegetation have been lost.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Diking; Filling; Wood/Structure Removal; Wetland Loss Fry Lack of large woody debris and pools limit productivity.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Migration Impediments Juveniles Juveniles and adults must pass six dams during migration.
Instantaneous Mortality Predation -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management; Species Management Predators: Fish; Predators: Avian Juveniles Predation, especially within reservoirs, is a primary limiting factor.
Sediment Conditions Increased Sediment Quantity Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Sediment: Bank Destabilization; Sediment: Upland Disturbance Eggs, fry Increased sediment load is problematic for steelhead. Sediment load impacts egg incubation and early life history stages.
Water Quality Temperature -- Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Riparian Degradation Juveniles Marginal summer temperatures affect juvenile rearing.
Water Quantity Decreased Water Quantity; Increased Water Quantity -- Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Riparian Degradation; Wood/Structure Removal; Water: Runoff Coefficient Alteration Juveniles, adults Increased peak flows and reduced low flows, resulting from upland canopy removal, poor riparian conditions and loss of ground cover in the uplands, limit fry colonization and juvenile rearing life stages.