Limiting Factors



Columbia Plateau Province

Tucannon Subbasin 391, 392, 393

BULL TROUT
Key Limiting Factor Impairment Habitat Affected Threat Type Threat Name Life Stage (s) Description
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices Migration Impediments Juveniles, adults Obstructions exist in Pataha Creek at river miles 1.3, 10.8, 25.7, 35.2, and 43.8. Additional obstructions exist at river mile 1.1. and 0.4 in Bihmaier Gulch and Dry Pataha creeks, respectively. Obstructions exist in the Tucannon River at river mile 5.5, 13.5, 16, 38.4, and 43. The Marengo-Tumalum geographic area contains several locations where diversion screens are absent or ineffective.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Riparian Agricultural Practices Riparian Degradation Juveniles, adults Connections among the floodplain, riparian vegetation, and off-channel vegetation have been lost.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices Riparian Degradation; Bank Destabilization Juveniles, adults Lack of large woody debris and pools limit productivity.
Sediment Conditions Increased Sediment Quantity Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Sediment: Bank Destabilization; Eggs, juveniles Sediment load impacts egg incubation and early life history stages. Marginal summer temperatures affect all life stages.
Water Quality Temperature -- Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Riparian Degradation All Marginal summer temperatures affect all life stages.
Water Quantity Decreased Water Quantity; Increased Water Quantity -- Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Riparian Degradation; Wood/Structure Removal; Water: Runoff Coefficient Alteration Juveniles, adults Increased peak flows and reduced low flows, resulting from upland canopy removal, poor riparian conditions and loss of ground cover in the uplands, limit fry colonization and juvenile rearing life stages.
FALL CHINOOK
Key Limiting Factor Impairment Habitat Affected Threat Type Threat Name Life Stage (s) Description
Biological Viability Criteria Diversity -- Artificial Propogation Straying Adult spawners Large numbers of stray fall Chinook spawning with indigenous populations pose serious genetic risks.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability; Morphological Changes Estuary Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Filling; Riparian Degradation; Wetland Loss Smolts Historical complex habitats have been modified through channelization, diking, development and other practices.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Morphological Changes Freshwater-Floodplain Erosion Control; Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Impervious Surfaces (Road Density); Riparian Degradation Juveniles Connections among the floodplain, riparian vegetation, and off-channel vegetation have been lost.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Riparian Agricultural Practices Diking; Filling; Riparian Degradation Juveniles Connections among the floodplain, riparian vegetation, and off-channel vegetation have been lost.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Diking; Filling; Wood/Structure Removal; Wetland Loss Fry Lack of large woody debris and pools limit productivity.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Fishery Management Harvest Adults Fall Chinook are subject to both ocean and freshwater harvest.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Migration Impediments Juveniles Juveniles and adults must pass six dams during migration.
Instantaneous Mortality Predation -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management; Species Management Predators: Fish; Predators: Avian Juveniles Predation, especially within reservoirs, is a primary limiting factor.
Sediment Conditions Increased Sediment Quantity Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Sediment: Bank Destabilization; Sediment: Upland Disturbance Eggs, fry Increased sediment load is problematic for fall Chinook. Sediment load impacts egg incubation and early life history stages.
Water Quantity Decreased Water Quantity; Increased Water Quantity -- Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Riparian Degradation; Wood/Structure Removal; Water: Runoff Coefficient Alteration Juveniles, adults Increased peak flows and reduced low flows, resulting from upland canopy removal, poor riparian conditions and loss of ground cover in the uplands, limit fry colonization and juvenile rearing life stages.
SPRING CHINOOK
Key Limiting Factor Impairment Habitat Affected Threat Type Threat Name Life Stage (s) Description
Biological Viability Criteria Diversity -- Artificial Propogation Straying Adult spawners Large numbers of stray spring Chinook spawning with indigenous populations pose serious genetic risks.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices Migration Impediments Juveniles Obstructions exist in the Tucannon River at river mile 5.5, 13.5, 16, 38.4, and 43. The Marengo-Tumalum geographic area contains several locations where diversion screens are absent or ineffective.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability; Morphological Changes Estuary Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Filling; Riparian Degradation; Wetland Loss Smolts Historical complex habitats have been modified through channelization, diking, development and other practices.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Morphological Changes Freshwater-Floodplain Erosion Control; Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Impervious Surfaces (Road Density); Riparian Degradation Juveniles Connections among the floodplain, riparian vegetation, and off-channel vegetation have been lost.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Riparian Agricultural Practices Diking; Filling; Riparian Degradation Juveniles Connections among the floodplain, riparian vegetation, and off-channel vegetation have been lost.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Diking; Filling; Wood/Structure Removal; Wetland Loss Fry Lack of large woody debris and pools limit productivity.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Fishery Management Harvest Adults Spring Chinook are subject to freshwater harvest.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Migration Impediments Juveniles Juveniles and adults must pass six dams during migration.
Instantaneous Mortality Predation -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management; Species Management Predators: Fish; Predators: Avian Juveniles Predation, especially within reservoirs, is a primary limiting factor.
Water Quality Temperature -- Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Riparian Degradation All Elevated summer water temperatures are a problem for spawning (pre-spawn holding) and egg incubation for spring Chinook. Marginal summer temperatures affect juvenile rearing for spring Chinook.
Water Quantity Decreased Water Quantity; Increased Water Quantity -- Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Riparian Degradation; Wood/Structure Removal; Water: Runoff Coefficient Alteration Juveniles, adults Increased peak flows and reduced low flows, resulting from upland canopy removal, poor riparian conditions and loss of ground cover in the uplands, limit fry colonization and juvenile rearing life stages.
SUMMER STEELHEAD
Key Limiting Factor Impairment Habitat Affected Threat Type Threat Name Life Stage (s) Description
Biological Viability Criteria Diversity -- Artificial Propogation Straying Adult spawners Large numbers of stray spring Chinook spawning with indigenous populations pose serious genetic risks.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices Migration Impediments Juveniles, adults Obstructions exist in Pataha Creek at river miles 1.3, 10.8, 25.7, 35.2, and 43.8. Additional obstructions exist at river mile 1.1. and 0.4 in Bihmaier Gulch and Dry Pataha creeks, respectively. Obstructions exist in the Tucannon River at river mile 5.5, 13.5, 16, 38.4, and 43. The Marengo-Tumalum geographic area contains several locations where diversion screens are absent or ineffective.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Access and Availability; Morphological Changes Estuary Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Filling; Riparian Degradation; Wetland Loss Smolts Historical complex habitats have been modified through channelization, diking, development and other practices.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Morphological Changes Freshwater-Floodplain Erosion Control; Agricultural Practices; Urbanization Diking; Impervious Surfaces (Road Density); Riparian Degradation Juveniles Connections among the floodplain, riparian vegetation, and off-channel vegetation have been lost.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Riparian Agricultural Practices Diking; Filling; Riparian Degradation Juveniles Connections among the floodplain, riparian vegetation, and off-channel vegetation have been lost.
Habitat Quantity and Quality Small-Scale Structural Complexity; Morphological Changes Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Diking; Filling; Wood/Structure Removal; Wetland Loss Fry Lack of large woody debris and pools limit productivity.
Instantaneous Mortality Anthropogenic Mortality -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management Migration Impediments Juveniles Juveniles and adults must pass six dams during migration.
Instantaneous Mortality Predation -- Dam or Hydropower Facility Management; Species Management Predators: Fish; Predators: Avian Juveniles Predation, especially within reservoirs, is a primary limiting factor.
Sediment Conditions Increased Sediment Quantity Freshwater-Instream Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Sediment: Bank Destabilization; Sediment: Upland Disturbance Eggs, fry Increased sediment load is problematic for steelhead. Sediment load impacts egg incubation and early life history stages.
Water Quality Temperature -- Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Riparian Degradation Juveniles Marginal summer temperatures affect juvenile rearing.
Water Quantity Decreased Water Quantity; Increased Water Quantity -- Agricultural Practices; Forest Management Riparian Degradation; Wood/Structure Removal; Water: Runoff Coefficient Alteration Juveniles, adults Increased peak flows and reduced low flows, resulting from upland canopy removal, poor riparian conditions and loss of ground cover in the uplands, limit fry colonization and juvenile rearing life stages.